News And Notes

All posts tagged "Bill Monroe"

Jun 28

Earl Scruggs’ Banjo Added to Country Music Hall of Fame & Museum’s Precious Jewels Display

Earl Scruggs

INDIO, CA – APRIL 25: Musician Earl Scruggs performs onstage during day one of California’s Stagecoach Country Music Festival held at the Empire Polo Club on April 25, 2009 in Indio, California. (Photo by Michael Buckner/Getty Images)

The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum has announced that Earl Scruggs’ Gibson RB-Granada Mastertone banjo will become a part of their Precious Jewels display. The banjo was Earl’s primary instrument and has never before been exhibited. It will go on display July 12.

The “Precious Jewels” display — located on the third floor within the museum’s core exhibition, Sing Me Back Home: A Journey Through Country Music — spotlights some of the instruments which built the foundation of American music.  Other instruments on display include Mother Maybelle Carter’s Gibson L-5 guitar, Lester Flatt’s Martin D-28 guitar, Bill Monroe’s Gibson F-5 mandolin, Jimmie Rodgers’ Martin 00-18 guitar and Hank Williams’ Martin D-28 guitar.  Continue Reading

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Posted at 12:11 pm | Permalink
Jun 21

Ricky Skaggs to Release Autobiography August 13

Ricky Skaggs

Ricky Skaggs’ 2013 autobiography, Kentucky Travler. Photo courtesy of Absolute Publicity.

Ricky Skaggs has done it all and will tell all with the release of his autobiography, Kentucky Traveler, on August 13. The book will be Ricky’s story of faith, family and music.

As a young boy in Cordell, Kentucky, Ricky learned to play mandolin at the age of five. By the time he was six, his talent was clear enough that his father became determined to get him on stage. When Bill Monroe came to a nearby small town, Ricky was there. At the insistence of the crowd changing “Let little Ricky sing one!,” Ricky’s music career began. Continue Reading

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Posted at 9:42 am | Permalink
May 15

GAC Album Review: Dailey & Vincent’s Brothers of the Highway

Dailey & Vincent

Dailey & Vincent’s 2013 album, Brothers of the Highway. Photo courtesy of APEX Entertainment Management.

Three-time IBMA Entertainer of the Year Dailey & Vincent stay the hardcore bluegrass course on their newest project, Brothers of the Highway, with a record full of immaculate harmonies, expert musicianship and more than a touch of nostalgia. Producing the album themselves, Jamie Dailey (vocals, guitar) and Darrin Vincent (vocals, bass) chose songs that have long inspired the duo after a meaningful conversation with bluegrass legend Ricky Skaggs left them wanting to revisit some of their all-time favorites. The result is a blistering 12-song set that covers the likes of The Louvin Brothers, Kathy Mattea and Vince Gill as banjo and twin fiddles fly.

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Posted at 11:34 am | Permalink
Apr 9

The Kentucky HeadHunters to Be Inducted into The Kentucky Music Hall of Fame

Kentucky HeadHunters

Kentucky HeadHunters photo by Ash Newell, courtesy of LCMedia.

The Kentucky HeadHunters will be inducted into the Kentucky Music Hall of Fame during a ceremony at the Lexington Center Bluegrass Ballroom on April 12. The museum is located in Renfro Valley, Kentucky, home of Bill Monroe, Merle Travis, The Everly Brothers, Loretta Lynn, Rosemary Clooney, Dwight Yoakam and many more.

Now in their 45th year, the band was formed on Richard and Fred Young’s family farm in Edmonton, Kentucky with cousins Greg Martin and Anthony Kenney. Then called Itchy Brothers and sometimes referred to as “The Best Known – Unknown Band in the South,” the group had several close brushes with record deals in the ’70s, including Led Zeppelin’s Swansong Records and Capricorn. Continue Reading

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Posted at 9:30 am | Permalink
Dec 24

2012 Rewind: No. 3 – Banjo Legend Earl Scruggs Dies at 88

Earl Scruggs

INDIO, CA – APRIL 25: Musician Earl Scruggs performs onstage during day one of California’s Stagecoach Country Music Festival held at the Empire Polo Club on April 25, 2009 in Indio, California. (Photo by Michael Buckner/Getty Images)

Country Music Hall of Famer Earl Scruggs passed away at a Nashville hospital on March 28. He popularized a three-fingered style of playing banjo that transformed the instrument and inspired countless musicians. He was 88.

Born in Shelby, North Carolina and raised on a farm in the Flint Hill area, Earl started playing banjo at age four after his father George, also a banjo player, died in 1928 following an illness. He and his musical partner, Lester Flatt, were the face of bluegrass in the ‘50s and ‘60s. Before that, he was a member of bluegrass creator Bill Monroe’s Blue Grass Boys. Continue Reading

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Posted at 8:11 am | Permalink
Jul 12

Academy of Country Music Pledges $2.5 Million to the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum

ACM & HOFThe Academy of Country Music has pledged $2.5 million to the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum’s Working on a Building: Country Music Lives Here campaign. The capital campaign will help finance the Museum’s expansion from 140,000 square feet to more than 350,000 square feet. The new space will include the ACM Contemporary Gallery which will display modern developments and current trends in country music.

The Academy has been a supporter of the Museum for years. In 2009, the ACM donated a lead gift of $300,000 to assist in the Museum’s acquisition of four instruments that were integral to the creativity and legacies of Maybelle Carter, Johnny Cash and Bill Monroe. The Academy has also supported the Museum’s All for the Hall Los Angeles benefits and is one of the sponsors of the museum’s new major exhibition, The Bakersfield Sound: Buck Owens, Merle Haggard, and California Country. The Academy has also donated usage of their entire photo database to the museum.

“It is the Academy’s honor to help ensure that the history of country music can be told for generations to come,” Bob Romeo, CEO of the Academy of Country Music, said. “We are able to make this kind of contribution only because of the incredible country music artists who give of their time for Academy charitable endeavors; we can’t thank them enough for the impact they have on our industry.”

“We are deeply indebted to the ACM for this wonderful gift, which will help us continue to fulfill our educational mission and serve our worldwide audience,” said Museum Director Kyle Young.  “The genre we chronicle is a living thing, constantly evolving; country music history is being made every day.  Great museums must remain relevant, and the ACM Contemporary Gallery will allow us to not only expand our examination and celebration of modern stars, important background players and new developments in the genre, but also to spotlight new artists, trends and issues as they break.”  Continue Reading

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Posted at 9:43 am | Permalink
Mar 28

Banjo Legend Earl Scruggs Dies at 88

Earl Scruggs

INDIO, CA - APRIL 25: Musician Earl Scruggs performs onstage during day one of California's Stagecoach Country Music Festival held at the Empire Polo Club on April 25, 2009 in Indio, California. (Photo by Michael Buckner/Getty Images)

GAC extends condolences to the family, friends and fans of Country Music Hall of Famer Earl Scruggs. The Tennessean reports Mr. Scruggs died Wednesday morning at a Nashville hospital. He was 88.

Scruggs popularized a three-fingered style of playing banjo that transformed the instrument, inspiring countless musicians and giving bluegrass one of its signature sounds.

Earl Eugene Scruggs was born in Shelby, N.C., and raised on a farm in the Flint Hill area. His father George, who played the banjo, died in 1928 following an illness. Earl started playing the banjo that year, at age 4.

“Dealing with the trauma of the death of his father at a young age, his emotional outlet turned to music,” Earl’s late wife (and manager) Louise Scruggs wrote in the liner notes to 2001’s Earl Scruggs and Friends album.

Scruggs and his musical partner, Lester Flatt, dominated bluegrass in the ‘50s & ‘60s. Before that, he was a member of bluegrass creator Bill Monroe’s Blue Grass Boys. He also influenced and played with a number of artists in other genres, including folk, country and rock. To this day, many music fans can still sing the 1962 Flatt & Scruggs song, “The Ballad of Jed Clampett,” which was the theme from the TV show The Beverly Hillbillies. In 1969, Flatt & Scruggs won a GRAMMY for Scruggs’ instrumental, the now-classic “Foggy Mountain Breakdown.”

Here’s just a taste of some vintage Flatt & Scruggs, courtesy of our friends at the Grand Ole Opry:

“He was the man who melted walls, and he did it without saying three words,” said Marty Stuart in 2000. For a complete Earl Scruggs obituary and career retrospective, visit The Tennessean.

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Posted at 8:33 pm | Permalink
Mar 14

Kentucky HeadHunters, Exile Among Kentucky Music Hall of Fame Inductees

Kentucky HeadHunters

Kentucky HeadHunters photo by Ash Newell, courtesy of LCMedia.

The Kentucky HeadHunters, Steven Curtis Chapman, Exile, Skeeter Davis, The Hilltoppers, Old Joe Clark and Emory & Linda Martin will be inducted into the Kentucky Music Hall of Fame and Museum as the 2013 class of professionals honored for their contribution to music in Kentucky and around the world. The announcement was made during a live press conference on WKYT-TV by Robert Lawson,executive director of the Hall of Fame.

“On behalf of the Kentucky Music Hall of Fame and Museum board of directors and staff I am honored to announce the 2013 Kentucky Music Hall of Fame Induction Class,” he said. “The 2013 class showcases why the state of Kentucky has produced some of the world’s greatest music achievers in all genres of music, and I am truly honored to recognize them with induction into the hall of fame.”

“I can’t tell you what an honor this is for us,” Richard Young of the Kentucky HeadHunters said. “We’re obviously proud to be from Kentucky, and this kind of recognition with this group of people is such a privilege.”

The induction ceremony will take place on April 12, 2013 at the Lexington Center Bluegrass Ballroom. Tickets for for the ceremony will go on sale April 9, 2012. For more information,  visit www.kentuckymusicmuseum.com. Past inductees include Loretta Lynn, Patty Loveless, Steve Wariner, Keith Whitley, Crystal Gayle, Dwight Yoakam, Wynonna & Naomi Judd, Ricky Skaggs, Tom T. Hall, Bill Monroe and many more.

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Posted at 10:34 am | Permalink
Jan 30

New Country Music Hall of Fame & Museum Exhibit Focuses on Heart Disease in Women

the JaneDear girls

The JaneDear girls photo courtesy of Warner Bros. Nashville.

The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum’s latest spotlight exhibit will be in support of the American Heart Association and Go Red For Women. The Exhibit, Something in Red, will feature red ensembles from several country stars including Sara Evans, Naomi Judd, and Lorrie Morgan. The exhibit opens on February 3, National Wear Red Day, and runs through April 2012.

The red dress symbolizes the fight against heart disease in women. Several country artists have parented with the American Heart Association and the museum to raise awareness for the disease, which is the number one killer in women.

Some of the dresses featured in Something in Red include Sara Evans’ dress from the1999 Academy of Country Music Awards, Naomi Judd’s leather-like jacket and skirt she wore at the 1987 Country Music Association Awards, the dress worn by the JaneDear girls’ Danelle Leverett on the cover of the duo’s debut album (photo above) and Susie Brown’s dress from the 2011 ACM Awards, and gowns worn by Lorrie Morgan and Julie Roberts on the Grand Ole Opry. Continue Reading

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Posted at 11:56 am | Permalink
Nov 3

Country Music Hall of Fame & Museum Opens Nudie Cohn Exhibit

L to R: Tex Williams, Gene Autry, Nudie Cohn, Roy Rogers, and Rex Allen in Nudie’s Hollywood store. Photo courtesy of the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum.

The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum opened a new spotlight exhibit dedicated to legendary fashion designer Nudie Cohn on October 28. The “Silver Threads and Golden Needles: Nudie’s Rodeo Tailors” exhibit will run through November 2012. The exhibit traces Nudie’s journey across America from designing burlesque costumes in New York to opening his shop in North Hollywood. Gene Autry, Elton John, Gram Parsons, Elvis Presley, Roy Rogers and Hank Williams are among the  artists who wore Nudie’s designs.

Born Nutya Kotlyrenko in Kiev, Ukraine, in 1902, Nudie immigrated to the United States when he was 11. He became ‘Nudie’ when immigration officials mistranslated his first name. His first job was shining shoes in Brooklyn and in 1918, he headed to California where he worked as a movie extra and film cutter before returning east. On his way back, he met Bobbie Kruger, whom he would later marry. The couple moved to New York, where Nudie found work designing burlesque costumes with his brother.

The Cohns returned to the west coast in the 1940s where they ran a small tailoring shop out of their Los Angeles-area garage for seven years. In 1947, Tex Williams commissioned ten outfits for his band from Nudie. With Tex’s endorsement, business started rolling in and Nudie opened his famous Nudie’s Rodeo Tailors. His slogan was ‘Everything for the Horse and Rider,’ though he began to cater to country artists and stars of western movies.

Nudie found his niche in the industry with the creation of a rhinestone-accented suit for Lefty Frizzell and began creating custom outfits for performers. He designed wagon-wheel suits for Porter Wagoner, Native-American motifs for Ray Price and a railroad-themed suit for Hank Snow inspired by Hank’s hit “The Golden Rocket.”

Working with embroidery specialist Rose Clements and fashion designer and one-time son-in-law Manuel, Nudie also designed instruments, cars, rugs and other items. Nudie was as much a celebrity as any of his clients and was featured on the cover of Rolling Stone in 1969. He passed away of kidney failure in 1984. Continue Reading

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Posted at 10:46 am | Permalink